23andMe vs Ancestry DNA

23andMe and AncestryDNA are two of the most well-known names in the field of genetic testing. They have a user base of almost 28 million people who have donated DNA samples between them!

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How are you supposed to choose between 23andMe and Ancestry DNA tests when there is so much hype, advertising, and competition between the two companies?

23andMe was the first company to provide genetic DNA testing kits to individuals directly. As a result of its early entry into the industry and the excitement it generated around the possibility of genetic testing, the company has acquired a user database of over 10 million people.

The Google Ventures-backed company offers an easy-to-use platform with some of the best health tests accessible. With over 2,000 global ethnic regions to which your DNA can be related, the company also offers broad and accurate ancestry testing, as well as a variety of other ancestry tools.

Ancestry, on the other hand, had been around for decades before genetic testing became available. The genealogy firm creates historical record databases and assists customers in creating full family trees using data from historical sources and personal materials.

Despite entering the market later than 23andMe, Ancestry was able to leverage its existing consumers to build a DNA database with over 18 million subscribers, much outnumbering 23andMe!

23andme vs Ancestry DNA

AncestryDNA is an autosomal DNA test, which looks at DNA passed down from all of your ancestors, including maternal and paternal lines, making it a better option for genealogical testing. 23andMe is an autosomal test that also looks at yDNA and mDNA.

AncestryDNA provides health testing, but 23andMe provides more advanced FDA-approved health testing.

Autosomal tests are the most common DNA tests. They study DNA inherited from both sides of your family and compare it to other samples to determine your ethnicity. With up to 95% accuracy, autosomal DNA tests can reveal family links up to seven generations, or roughly 210 years, in the past.

Although mtDNA is inherited from your mother and yDNA is inherited from your father, yDNA testing is only available to men. On your mother’s or father’s side, these forms of DNA reveal the haplogroup, or lineage, from which you descended.

23andMe uses this information to tell you about your forefathers and mothers from tens of thousands of years ago, as well as their movement habits.

How Do 23andme And Ancestry DNA Tests Differ?

The results you get will differ due to the various types of DNA that the tests search for. AncestryDNA only provides an ethnic breakdown of your DNA via an interactive map, whereas 23andMe provides far more information.

The results from AncestryDNA are less varied and instructive than those from 23andMe. You can also look at your ancestors’ movement patterns and how many Neanderthal mutations you have in your DNA.

The visualizations created by 23andMe were also substantially more interesting. Unlike AncestryDNA, which only provides a map, 23andMe offers extras like Your Ancestry Timeline and Your Chromosome Painting. Finally, 23andMe has a lot more to give.

Both tests let you compare your DNA to that of hundreds of other ethnic groups. AncestryDNA, on the other hand, has 499 locations compared to 171 for 23andMe as of this writing. There are now 328 additional areas in total.

This is owing to AncestryDNA’s 169 regions on European migrations to the Americas, Africa, and other areas of the globe. 23andMe has yet to discover the DNA of European settlers.

People of European ancestry had a disproportionately high number of areas in both tests when compared to other ethnic groups. Seventy-four percent of AncestryDNA’s European areas are European, compared to thirty percent for 23andMe.

What Are The Similarities Between The 23andme And Ancestry DNA Tests?

AncestryDNA and 23andMe both offer a DNA matchmaking service that allows you to locate and communicate with genetic relatives. AncestryDNA has tested the DNA of more than 10 million people, while 23andMe has tested the DNA of more than 5 million.

That means AncestryDNA has a much better chance of connecting you with a relative than 23andMe. Signing up for Ancestry.com’s enormous genealogical data can also help you narrow down your search, but there is a cost.

Ancestry.com has created millions of family trees using over 11 billion records based on marriage and death certificates, immigration dates, and military data.

AncestryDNA and 23andMe both offer a DNA matchmaking service that allows you to locate and communicate with genetic relatives. AncestryDNA has tested the DNA of more than 10 million people, while 23andMe has tested the DNA of more than 5 million.

That means AncestryDNA has a much better chance of connecting you with a relative than 23andMe. Signing up for Ancestry.com’s enormous genealogical data can also help you narrow down your search, but there is a cost.

Ancestry.com has created millions of family trees using over 11 billion records based on marriage and death certificates, immigration dates, and military data.

Both tests upgrade their data and algorithms on a regular basis in order to improve the results. When a service’s ethnicity estimate improves over time, you should expect to be told.

So Which One Should I Use?

Ancestry and 23andMe are two companies that provide industry-leading ancestry tests. If you want a fantastic user experience and quick results, AncestryDNA is superior, while 23andMe’s Ancestry + Traits Kit is better.

Although clients with serious genetic health issues should still consult their doctor and obtain a more complete DNA panel that examines all of the variants linked to a certain disease or problem, 23andMe currently outperforms Ancestry in the health-testing game.

Fortunately, you can access your raw DNA data from each of these companies! That means that whichever company you choose, you will have options.

If health testing isn’t a priority for you, you might be able to get the most out of your DNA test by purchasing an ancestry DNA test kit and uploading the raw data to companies that can provide information on a variety of qualities that big corporations don’t report on.